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ten, rask, broD, dom .....what do....

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Messenger: Ras KebreAB Sent: 6/19/2007 12:24:35 PM
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Then perhaps you will be intersted to know, or you may know already, that the Blue Nile Falls in Ithiopia is called Tiss Issat by ini the "natives"
Tiss Issat = Smoke of Fire


Messenger: still looking Sent: 6/19/2007 5:02:25 PM
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ten, (this is still looking's wife)

i have been reading the recent post on zimbabwe,you said you respect mugabe,so do I, and I love the man. I am so proud of him for standing up to the west, but don't you think its time to reevaluate
and think about what the people are going through, and by the way, the people are the majority, the masses, the poor people, the rural people, the people who live in the high density areas, the ones that have to stand on street corners to sell tomatoes,and run away when the police come. The rich people in Zimbabwe would love to see this situation continue because they are benefiting from it. I know this for a fact. I had some of the so called rich struggling people; husbands, wives and their children here for a wedding most likely traveling first class for that matter, so we certainly see zimbabwe and the distribution of wealth differently, There are so many issues that you have mentioned that I could address, for instance you said the political situation in Zimbabwe is stable , I think not, especially when people go around carrying registrations from both political parties in zimbabwe, because they never know whom they are going to run into and be asked which party they belong to. sorry to interrupt your communication with my husband. If you had been in the
chimurenga liberation struggle, you probably would realize that, what is going on in Zimbabwe right now is not what all those people in the struggle died for.

peace.



Messenger: Ten Sent: 6/21/2007 7:29:01 AM
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Give Thanks
To Still Looking's Wife:
Sister thank you for your blessed words, no need for the I to apologise you were not interrupting anything - the more people coming to reason on this forum the better. And even more its blessed thing to hear a voice from home, so I hope to communicate with you more. Regarding Zimbabwe, my position regarding Zimbabwean politics is something I don't want to be to vocal about - I've tried to lay low because I always think to protect home than to say bad. Firstly I respected Mugabe because of what he did in the liberation struggle, as someone instrumental in freeing the nation, I give respect to the gallant sons and daughters who fought for me to be grow up in a free nation, that is my native home. The steps made in the 80s towards social reforms such as education and health are definitely worth commending. Zimbabwe had one of the highest literacy rates in Southern Africa and our standard of education certainly among the best right up until about 2000. The Uni of Zim and NUST whose reputations spread far n wide and were places I dreamed of going there but the 3A's required to enter were not to be for I. Anyway back to economic politics true I agree that the rural majority suffer the most and the urban poor too and the vendors do get the worst treatment from the police; in the days of Murambatsvina people's wares were confiscated and were not returned. I remember buying flowers on the black market from a Rasta brother, Benjamin because the flower vendors were not allowed to have their space along the pavements. I know its true of what you say and for me my initial reponse when people ask of Zim is to have a laissez faire attitude and be easy bec I never know to whom I am speaking. But as for the rich, well I guess your experience is different from mine because I know people who've mad money the honest way, after years of struggle they now cannot cope with the situation in Zimbabwe, kids studying outside the country cannot get fees paid because the Reserve Bank does not have the money and even when they do there is so much paperwork, extremely senseless strict rules and processing takes forever and a day people are forced to buy forex on the streets and pay fees that way. Same thing for people who need travel funds for holiday, health care and to buy business equipment. Even fuel importers have to hustle to get money to bring in fuel. Not every rich person has political contacts who can open doors for them and not every one considered middle to upper middle class in the 90s and early 2000s is still that way today. Many have left professional jobs, sold businesses and homes because life was becoming difficult - granted the rich feel the pinch less than the poor but they feel it still. I'm not denying the hardships the poor go through, they can't even afford the basics and in the high density areas that's where police brutality is most rife and I've heard the most cruel things happen to people - I was giving my experience of Zim, ignorant as it is bec I've not directly experienced political violence and I might be called a m'salala, but that's a class distinction I try not to fit into...I'm interested however in your involvement in the Chimurenga because my studies relate to women's writing that portrays the struggle, would you want to talk about that. Please let me know.


Messenger: Ten Sent: 6/21/2007 7:41:22 AM
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Empress Yaa
The Victoria Falls are a mystic place indeed, walking through there you feel rainshowers through the trees and everything is so green. You can smell the earth, a rich n heavy smell and you can hear the falls from miles away. To sight them is truly an angelic sight. The name is Mosi O A Tunya - the Smoke That thunders - and the God of the mighty Zambezi waters is called Nyami Nyami. When the Rhodesians built the Kariba Dam (in another town Kariba which is 200km north east of Vic Falls (the town)) in the 1960s, there was an earthquake and many animals had to be evacuated from the area, some died. Even now minor tremors are recorded in that area bec its not very stable because of the Dam. People say Nyami Nyami the water serpent was angry when the Dam was built so he was roaring through the earth.


Messenger: Yaa Asantewa Sent: 6/21/2007 9:04:42 AM
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*sigh.... wow... "You can smell the earth, a rich n heavy smell and you can hear the falls from miles away." I was right there.

Blessed Love Empress,

Many thanks for the little window, courtesy of your soul-full memory. I really felt it. And I know I don't have to wait long before I get to trod that soil. Yum.

I love the reasonings about Africa. I feel like, "this is more like it". Let's reason critically about the African victories, and methods for improvement.

I often wish I could give each African leader a copy of "The Third Testament- The Ilect Verses of Emperor Haile I Selassie I" (Intro by Ras Miguel Lorne). It's practically a break down "how to" handbook on how to run a modern African State. It's got everything in there; his speeches on transport systems, education, health, production... everything. In every area His Majesty has broken down the objective theory that must be followed to successfully implement governmental order. It is pretty much a blue print for a theocracy; an original African invention, the natural state of true rulership.

Wouldn't that be fantastic?!

But anyway... this is what makes me chuckle to myself about this Biblical style of waiting around for "judgement day" armageddeon style vibes. Ras Tafari made us mobile creatures, self determinate, with a power of choice. Then ones and ones sit around reading the Bible all day as if that is revolution. Nah! It ain't. His Majesty appeared to give us the tools of our own salvation. So it for InI to live the revolution and secure our own safety from the judgement that is trickling all around as we speak.

We are the first generation of Africans to really stop fighting our liberation, and start making outlandish compromises. We are the first generations to really be losing the argument.

So, I think, within this generation when you get a blessing call from Ras Tafari... you supposed to grab on to it with all your grip, figure out the blessing and start to mobilise it!

It is a duty.

Ras Ta love.


Messenger: Ras KebreAB Sent: 6/21/2007 9:17:42 AM
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Give thanks sistren, truly give thanks

Emperor King Selassie I done sit with the highly and the lowly and show them all things. None of them,Black or White or whoever, cannot say they were never told
Give thanks Sistren Ten,for the memory, from the way the I speak, you might as well have been speaking of Tiss Issat falls, a place i can honestly say is the most beautiful spot on Jah Earth i have been privileged enough to sight. Africa is mine

Rastafari I Love
Jah Rastafari


Messenger: still looking Sent: 6/21/2007 12:29:22 PM
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has any seen the book by bono, "On the move"?

i had just bought a book and left the store but had to run back in and came across it. small little book about ending poverty and aids. i flipped through it for a few moments and my eyes filled up. it will be the next purchase.

respect to Africa


Messenger: still looking Sent: 6/21/2007 6:40:47 PM
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Thanks for taking time to respond. I understand why we have to be guarded about what we say, its true you never know who is on the other end.

PEACE


Messenger: Ten Sent: 6/22/2007 6:42:35 AM
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Greetings Still Looking
Give thanks I for being bold and kind enough to share a piece of yourself with the rest of us. I hope that you have passed on my reply to your wife and she will participate in the forum more often. Thanks to her too, it was nice to hear a voice from home and as I said my work is in Zimbabwean womenís writing that reflects that period and if sheíd like to talk more about her role in the struggle, Iíd truly appreci-love that. Now back to the I and crafting a response that I hope is as lengthy and worthwhile a read as yours. Iíll go through each thing I wish to reason on:
Firstly I you say ďif I ask someone to prove to me there is a god and they say "look, that tree is a sign of god" I say no that tree is a sign of lifeď This is a liĎl confusing to I because to me that which is life, or a sign of life is God, for the Most High is life. ThatĎs HIS signature mark of His existence, as a seed is planted in the ground and generates into a tree that bears fruit and more seeds God Ďplantedí Creation that grew through the processes of nature from seed to tree, rivulet to a river to ocean, even from a grain of sand into a mountain. For I JAH is that process, that force which initiated the beginning of nature - like the energy the I sees as having begun something, I name that energy, whereas you donít. The energy cannot be seen as a singular force, its a multiplicity, to I something that is continually generative and mutating so that there are many forces of God at work - all so different but connected as one. Its like God as the power of the Trinity as Spirit, Man and the Father - all in one as Sellasie I. And this is how I choose to name God. For I giving creative force that name - JAH/God/YHWH further explains what life means, giving it a special kind of value. So naming things through God gives me insight into this world.
Maybe Iím going round in circles, but Iím unravelling things in my mind as I write so thatís how I express myself. Iíll try n explain further in the hope yídonít get muddled, but in naming there is power, not only in claiming that tree as begat of some supernatural force but also in reclaiming that supernatural force whose power has been disavowed by many disciplines such as science, history, some philosophies (like Des Cartes I think therefore I am which is an individualist form of thought that has been used to give humans a distorted God complex). Even theology itself has viewed God as non-existent and Iím not talking spiritual atheism as the I termed but of God as totally devoid of any substance in this world and then you have various religious factions from the fundamentalists to the happy clappers forcing people to submit to their authority by claiming the apocalypse is now. Invoked with fear people part with all their riches, children and worldly values to avoid judgement from God, such fallacies do a disservice to God, they misrepresent and misname God because He is not to be found in these discourses. I feel that in renaming the tree as a sign of God one is giving back the power of God, giving back to the physical signs of His presence - not some of the misguided theories of people. Redefining God by naming something not as awe or wonder as the I does, also seeks to spiritually anchor this world; give trees, birds, a grain of sand as elements of the power of God. To say its life is not enough for I, it has to go a step further, to get the fullness of what life means and I see it in HIM.
So for I the power of naming extends into so many areas of I levity - where the I says naming puts people in boxes, I see self-naming (not labelling) as that which seeks to give back oneís identity. Its like being Black and female - historically Black women have been raped, beaten, colonised n enslaved physically and mentally. They have been written out of history as thoug they were the silent maids n slaves of an oppressive system or miswritten as the ímothers of the nationí who do nothing but give birth (I am not talking about the power of motherhood in a negative way please) as though thatís all women can do. In Zim women fought in the Chimurenga but their experiences were sidelined and only in 1988 was the first novel portraying womenís voices, 1990 was the first published real-life testimonies. Such silencing is what I am against too in religious matters, for I saying I am Black, I am woman is me taking back the power to speak of my body, my self, my ethnicity or my race (as specific to me and not necessarily for ALL Black people). So for I being rooted is something very important, being able to stake my place of belonging as a vantage point from which I can view the world and gain deeper understanding of I self. Rasta gives I those spiritual roots and its not about being put in a box, but speaking about me seen? Others can label and categorise for their own specifications but in terming myself as Rasta I am staking my claim in this life, for all time and its not about holding fast to doctrines either. But for me its my relationship with the life-giving force. There were no rules in Rasta, just levity so thatís how I came to it. Like you I donít like boxes n boundaries, but where we differ is I believe in self-definition as a form of expression, I believe naming restores power and I believe in roots for I roots were taken away by colonisers n slave masters and now I come to take them back. My cultural form of worship was smashed to pieces and I have is bits n pieces so Iíve got to re-order that through this form, this movement which is Rastafari. I hail Sellasie I in recognition of a Black Christ King and also in recognition of my ancestors too who guide I in this life...
But this does not mean I am inflexible I. I am open to things but if I were speaking to a Hare Krishna on their consciousness, we would reason of Krishna but I would not say I was Hare Krishna. No I would see how I can relate the notions of karma n such to Rasta levity. I used to go for Yoga classes n learnt the chants of Raj Yoga, the philosophy of Om Shanti n such and for I it was about overing JAH more, not about switching n saying I Yogi because Iím at the Raj Yoga centre but soon as I walk out of here Iím back to I self. I have to know where I stand so I call myself by the many things that make up who I am. My roots are Shona but they are coloured red, gold n green and thatís how I grow as a tree to the sky, reaching out and taking in a little of everything.
Finally sometimes people ask/assume things of others because of their own desire to have belonging or as evidence of the power of group think - everyone is of the same mindset and for someone who is different/minority it feels exclusionary. Iím still learning not to be presumptuous, but that I think will be a life-long lesson.
There is still much to cover in your post, but I hope this shall suffice for now. Blessed Love






Messenger: still looking Sent: 6/22/2007 2:48:02 PM
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respect for the reply,

just writing to let you know that the short reply before yours is from my wife.

respect


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